Questions

How Long Does It Take to De-clutter Paperwork?

Realistically three hours is the minimum time needed to see results. To build rapport and to gain an understanding of the issues. The time taken will depend on:

  • How much clutter there is
  • How easily you can let go of paperwork
  • How much you want to be involved
  • Whether new systems are needed

Do I Need To Be There?

Most clients prefer to work alongside Simply Sorted, deciding what they want to keep and what they can 'let go'. Sometimes clients ask Alison to sort out whole filing cabinets by herself. When everything has been categorised, a consultation can then take place about how best paperwork can be accessed and filed to suit your circumstances.

After a bereavement, Simply Sorted can sort out your lost one's paperwork - either with you or independently. Alison can also prepare papers for probate - potentially a large saving on solicitors' fees.

Why Can't I Do It Myself?

If you have a lot of paper piles, it's easy to get bogged down. You can feel trapped and overwhelmed. Paying an independent organiser gives you a kick-start. After one session many clients feel motivated enough to carry on by themselves.

Will You Make Me Throw Things Out?

Simply Sorted allows clients to make all the decisions. There's no element of force. Sometimes Alison may gently challenge the reasons for hoarding - or not if not appropriate. 10 years of experience mean that Alison works as gently as needed, depending on clients' circumstances and wishes.

What About Confidentiality?

A confidentiality agreement can be signed before the session.

What If You Break Something?

This has not yet happened in 10 years! Obviously accidents can occur and Simply Sorted shall not be liable for any losses or damages.

Do I Need To Do Anything Before You Come?

Think about what you are trying to achieve by de-cluttering the space. Having objectives for the future will make a big difference to the success of the process. Clinging on to 'stuff' from the past means that you may partially stay stuck in the past.